he hath turned a heaven into hell

Hermia uses these words when she tells Helena that she and Lysander are eloping and leaving Athens. Athens, her home, has been turned into a 'hell' by her love. Montrose sees this as an example of the upheaval of women's solidarity by the demand that a wife subordinate herself to her husband:

Heterosexual desire disrupts the innocent pleasures of Hermia's girlhood: 'What graces in my love do dwell, / That he hath turn'd a heaven into hell!' (I i 206-7). Hermia's farewell to Helena is also a farewell to their girlhood friendship, a delicate repudiation of youthful homophilia. (Montrose 1996: 110)

in the text:

That he hath turn'd a heaven into hell!' (I i 206-7).

related comments:

Women's constancy to men but not to each other.